Iranian human rights lawyer exposes mass executions and claims Iran is “not to be trusted” with nuclear power

06 February 2015

 
Iranian human rights lawyer Kaveh Moussavi gave a sobering account of ongoing human rights abuses in Iran, and said that the regime cannot be trusted with nuclear power, in a lecture given at a screening of the French-Iranian film Persepolis organised by the Foundation for Law, Justice and Society at Wolfson College on Wednesday.

Kaveh Moussavi, who worked in the Tehran Bar in the 70s until he was removed by the Iranian authorities for opposition activities, made the comments at the screening of the Cannes Jury Prize-winning film, which depicts the repression suffered by Iranian citizens under the regime since the Revolution of the 1970s.

Mr Moussavi, who became Head of Public Interest Law at Oxford before focusing on human rights litigation work, described the human rights situation in Iran since the murder of an estimated 6–7,000 prisoners in the aftermath of the Iran–Iraq war. Citing the Human Rights Watch Report Ministers of Murder: Iran’s New Security Cabinet, he threw light on key events such as the so-called Green Movement that followed the 2009 elections, which resulted in nearly 1,000 deaths and the show trial and subsequent execution of around one hundred political prisoners.

Mr Moussavi also addressed the ongoing stand-off between Iran and the US over the development of Iran’s nuclear programme, arguing that: “There is a reason why Iran cannot be trusted with nuclear power. Regimes that are a menace to their own people are very likely to be a menace to their neighbours too.”

There is a reason why Iran cannot be trusted with nuclear power. Regimes that are a menace to their own people are very likely to be a menace to their neighbours too.

He closed his talk by commenting on the ongoing revelations surrounding the case of Alberto Nisman, the Argentinian prosecutor who is believed to have been murdered on the eve of exposing a cover-up of the alleged involvement of the Iranian authorities in the 1994 bombing of the Amia Jewish Centre in Buenos Aires.

The event was held as part of the FLJS termly film screenings, at which guest speakers provide firsthand insights on the issues of law, justice and society raised in the films.

A podcast of Mr Moussavi’s lecture is available from the link on the right. To receive news of all our latest podcasts and forthcoming events, subscribe to our newsletter, or follow us on Twitter.
 

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